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Wall Street Journal: Do the Math-The Percentage of Expat Homeschoolers is Growing

LONDON— When Russian Alla Jilobokov and her Costa Rican/American husband Javier Casasnovas moved back to Costa Rica from the United States in 2004, they initially enrolled their two daughters in a top international school in San José. Though tuition was expensive—about $2,000 a month— it was the expected thing to do in their family and social circles. Read more

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WSJ Expat: How Was Your Child’s International Teacher Hired?

LONDON--Sonali Banerjee Hutchison is still unpacking boxes from the move she and her family made from Manila, in the Philippines, to Dhaka, Bangladesh, earlier this summer.

Having lived in the Philippines for 11 years, where she and her husband, Dale, worked for international schools (he as a high school history teacher and she as a guidance counselor), they decided to make a move last year, wanting a change of pace and new experiences for themselves and their two young boys. Though Mrs. Hutchison describes their move as “exciting but frustrating,” the American couple are looking forward to their new jobs at the International School Dhaka and getting to know their new city. Read more

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International New York Times: Weekend Courses Encourage Female Conductors

OXFORD, England — Dressed in shorts with tights and sneakers, her brown hair pulled back, Charlotte Lynch looked like any other 25-year-old graduate student when she stepped to the podium in front of the eight-piece string orchestra. Read more

International New York Times: Homegrown Help for Deserving Students in Nepal

Teenagers of KOTH GAUN, Nepal

KOTH GAUN, Nepal — It is not the easiest of villages to find: Up a narrow dirt road full of hairpin turns, which turns into an even narrower walking path, there are severe drop-offs on one side, with sweeping views of the Katmandu Valley and hilly farmland on the other. Another steep rocky dirt path to the right of the water pump finally leads to this tiny hamlet of Koth Gaun.

Though there is electricity, the toilets are outside and the furniture in the homes consists of straw mats and bamboo stools; goats, chickens and a few cats share the living space. These are not auspicious living conditions for scholars, but this is the place Jeny Shrestha and Jayanta Tamang call home. Read more

International New York Times: Adult Education Eases Path to Career Change

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LONDON — Walking around her design studio in London’s elegant Chelsea neighborhood, Jennifer Manners pulled out a box stocked full of all different-colored yarns, from deep blues to warm grays and spirited reds. “It’s like a doctor’s kit bag,” she said jokingly, opening up one of the trays filled with a palette of green to point out a few specific yarns. “Greens can be tricky. You would be surprised how many times we debate over which two of these colors is better.”

Ms. Manners, who moved into her studio a few months ago, uses the space for client meetings and as a place to display her custom carpets, which she designs and then has handmade in India and Nepal. She started her company, which bears her name, only a few years ago, and already has an upscale client base spread across London as well as a boutique hotel in Hampshire that will be using her carpets throughout the property. Read more