New York Times: A Polish Collector’s Passion for Art and Dance

POZNAN, POLAND — The reception area of Grazyna Kulczyk’s private office looks a bit bare because many items have already been packed away. But the view is intact: the rooftops of Poznan, a city of brick buildings in west-central Poland. “It is a lovely view,” she said, smiling and looking out over the green park. Read more

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New York Times: Putting Bangladeshi Art on the Map

LONDON–Rajeeb and Nadia Samdani of Bangladesh have carved out a niche as supporters and promoters of South Asian art. Based in Dhaka, the couple founded the Samdani Art Foundation in 2011 to raise awareness of Bangladeshi contemporary art. In 2012, the foundation put on the first edition of the Dhaka Art Summit, or DAS, a noncommercial research and exhibition for South Asian art. Read more

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International New York Times: Laotian Artist Helps redefine Contemporary

Marisa Darasavath

VIENTIANE, Laos — Marisa Darasavath has made a name for herself as one of the foremost contemporary artists in her home country of Laos. But pay her a compliment about her work, and she reacts humbly, with a giggle or a self-deprecating drop of the head.

In 2013, Ms. Darasavath was one of two contemporary Laotian artists to be featured at the Singapore Biennale. She also participated in Japan’s Fukuoka Asian Art Triennale in 2009 and has had her works exhibited in Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur and Bali. During 2011 she did a two-month residency in Singapore through M Gallery, which is based in Singapore but has an outpost in the Laotian capital, Vientiane. Read more

International New York Times: Warsaw’s Leto Gallery Nurtures Young Talents

2 female and one male with hands on their heads

WARSAW, Poland — As with so many really good and really bad ideas, this one was conceived over a few beers.

Marta Kolakowska was sitting one evening in the upstairs office of her Warsaw art gallery, Leto, with two of her artists, Radek Szlaga and Honza Zamojski, talking half-seriously about applying to the Frieze Art Fair’s inaugural New York show in May 2012. Read more

Frieze: Postcard from Michigan


DETROIT, MICHIGAN–In May, the art world was horrified when rumour spread that Detroit’s emergency manager, Kevin Orr, was investigating whether some valuable pieces in the multibillion dollar collection of the Detroit Institute of Art (DIA) – which include iconic works by van Gogh, Picasso and Whistler – could be sold off to cover the city’s $15 billion debt to creditors. Luckily, however, in mid-June, the Michigan attorney general announced that no pieces in collection could be, ‘sold, conveyed or transferred to satisfy City debts or obligations’, which, says Graham W.J. Beal, the British director of the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), came as a ‘fantastic relief.’ Unlike most major civic museums in the US, the city of Detroit has, since 1919, owned the building and the collection, while exhibitions, fundraising and daily operations are overseen by the Founders’ Society, a nonprofit institution. ‘Now, we can go back to being the forward thinking, innovative art museum that we are known for,’ said Mr. Beal, sitting under one of the DIA’s large murals painted by Diego Rivera, which depict industry in Detroit in the 1930s, pharmaceuticals, birth and the manufacture of poison gas in World War One. Read more